Category Archives: News

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Kill la Kill: A Final Stretch (Beyond Gainax)

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Twists at breakneck speeds, revelations abound, and allegiances reversed. There seems to be no stopping the heartpounding freight train that is Kill La Kill’s final stretch of episodes. Common cause has been unveiled, leaving it a war of nudes versus clothed avatars of shame, and former enemies now aligned with the once thought only rebellion. With many of the principle roles now falling perfectly into what could be considered destined ones, only one element remains dangling precariously; heroine, Ryuko Matoi. Traumatized, distraught, and more than a little angry about the truth of her origin, her rudder is all but completely broken off. Unwilling to see herself as part of any side other than her own, it is up to a most unexpected ally to make a grand leap in hopes of her salvation. (even if it means beating the tar out of her first..)

 

Contrary to what the internet would like you to believe, it’s often a great pleasure to be wrong. Looking back at twenty episodes of Studio Trigger’s grand kiss-off/GAINAX love-fest, Kill La Kill, one couldn’t truly be faulted for being a tad presumptuous after years of often disheartening material. So what happened to make this jaded naysayer hit the about-face button so violently? Well, the show as it has been thus far owes much of its success to not only understanding the so-called Gainax formula so well, but to how well it eschews so much of what often hobbles many of the mother studio’s shows. More about playing with form, rather than clumsily taping together with function. What Imaishi and company have successfully fashioned, is the first truly post-Gainax series. One that takes everything since Top Wo Nerae!, and amps up the levels to near murderous methedrine levels, complete with hair-raising cliffhangers every week. Honesty time, it has truly been a long, long time since I have felt this way with any show.

 

Say what one wishes about previous Imaishi efforts, this is the first truly breakthrough series from a director who’s style has often overridden any semblance of meaning within and without. As great as Tengen Toppa Gurren Lagaan is, there remains a feeling there that is more akin to a dry run at “Hero’s Journey” territory. What KLK offers up, is something both representative of his powers as a stylist, and as a fledgling visual satirist, doling out both incredible energies and sneaking wit beneath oodles of crimson chaos. Even when the show hits an occasional iffy note, more often than not it is countered with something far wilder and more insane that what had come before. Always on the brink of total collapse, the show flirts so often with the bad, and yet it corrects course as if performing a high-wire act, knowing full well that the key to a successful display of showmanship, is the semblance of fallibility. KLK seems to know very well that it’s playing matters quite close to the wire, and yet it never steps away from the edge of that ravine.

 

And it’s all in the service of some very real concerns regarding the delicate balance not only the young must maintain in life affairs, but everyone. Even as the show has made it alarmingly clear that issues are to be approached in grandiose, broad strokes, it does so with such a deft, visual manner that it almost becomes a moving political mural. A warning, not only to the elder otaku set, but to all passionates that the moral standings we take are often of a musical chairs nature. One of the show’s biggest stylistic triumphs is in how it eschews a lot of the typical muddled anime thematic posturing that bogs most series down, and allows action to dictate more. Even as characters spout out about their requisite viewpoints, it is often within battle that their truest intentions for the world are made clear. Imaishi seems to finally have grand control of his best strengths(visual hyperbole and overt visual metaphors), and is hitting far more than missing this time around. And Nakashima’s story supervision has kept the story developing at such a uniquely effective clip, that one doesn’t mind so much when grand escapes happen, and one is asking questions as to how. This particular story is about the language of action, and what happens when we run so hard against another that we begin seeing the other side’s attributes. That there is more than one justice in the world, and in life we find ourselves dabbling in more than one to see what fits. The origin of community as we strive toward larger goods despite differences. While some of these were indeed explored in TTGL, it feels so much more refined and singular here.

 
And yes, I realize the absurdity of using “refined” to describe a series that largely consists of largely disrobed teens fighting to the tune of immense collateral damage. But despite all the anarchy and unisex debasement on display, it all seems to be in the name of greater ambitions for anime on television. Even if Kill La Kill’s final stretch turns out to be a typical series flameout, it will no doubt be spectacular. I can’t imagine the staff behind this having it any other way.

 

(Oh, yes. And I have to remark here that I kind of geeked out about those flashbacks regarding a younger Ragyo & Soichiro Kiryuin. Their hair.  Maaaan.)

Through Older Lenses: Ghibli Night At The Egyptian

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Imagine the saucers I had for eyes upon the discovery that Hollywood’s fabled Egyptian Theatre was hosting a multi-week tribute to the films of Studio Ghibli, and that two longtime favorites were sharing a bill this weekend. Upon hearing the news early Saturday, I told a partner of this and held steadfast that this could be our nocturnal activity. And considering that this new quantity has had little to no knowledge of the works of legendary animators, Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata, this felt like a brilliant entry point. As both films represent Miyazaki at something of a career turning point (firmly planted between humanist blockbuster maven, and quasi-individualist auteur), the commonalities and breaks seemed just right to allow new eyes to survey what it is that has captured the hearts of animation fans the world over. And while personal feelings have shifted some on these films over the years, it was truly magnificent witnessing these films in their full 35mm glory, complete with scratches, pops, and prolonged silences.

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At roughly 7:00pm, we filed on in, and found seats surrounded by fellow attendees. As ideal as the seats were, I was quite impressed by the serious dearth of “anime folk” in the audience. In fact, a great deal of those in the auditorium with us were either fellow cinephiles, the occasional family, and possibly more local animation and effects artist types. The overall feeling was that of a more well-rounded viewership than I have ever been privy to for a screening like this, and that was certainly telling of Ghibli’s impact in the years since Disney/PIxar brought Ghibli’s catalog to the US masses. In a very real way, it felt as if Miyazaki’s works have finally become part of the general fabric of family film in a way that eluded many of us admirers in previous decades. It truly has been a long time since that fateful Cagliostro Castle screening at the Disneyland Hotel, with not only nerds, but parents and kids with eyes aglow at the sheer kinetic artistry gracing that audience.

Truly a long time.

So also imagine my surprise when upon giving Kiki’s Delivery Service(1989) the nth viewing, I found a great deal more to derive personally from it than I had expected. Even in the many years since first watching it, there is a confidence and effective simplicity that still evokes a potent response regarding the inherent potential in all. While many have continued to write the film off as a crowd-pleasing adaptation of Eiko Kadono’s work, it is also very much a touching call to the young, and for them to follow beyond familial piety. As young witch, Kiki seeks to create a name for herself in bayside, Koriko City, there is much to figure out as many a witch have within them a special ability that they hone into their main focus of practice. And in this single year of being away from her family (including a potions-specialist mother who muses about wishing her daughter had taken up potions as her focus), Kiki and her chatty feline familiar, Jiji must find the central meaning to independent life. Through many meetings, trials, errors, and adventures, Kiki is throughout the film faced with her own self-doubts as a girl in the world, let alone a witch. It’s a story where magic is no more than the things we grant to the world as ourselves. Told in a patient, wistful manner, the film never veers far from the focal point that Kiki is that moment between being our family’s child, and our own giving, working individual. (Which is best encapsulated by the film’s opening scene, as Kiki makes the sudden choice to leave for her one-year trip at the behest of unprepared parents. It is both a charming, and heartrending stuff that evokes feelings of that moment so many of us go through, as we move out into the world.)

POTENTIAL SPOILERS(?)

So when Kiki’s journey inevitably leads to a crisis of ability come the latter third, it is vital to consider the preceding hour as lead in for this. With all the pressures that she must carry with her as both girl and witch, as other girls her age in town are living up to many of the atypical fun and relationship building, she must maintain something of an icon of tradition. We even meet another young witch early on that informs us early how this rite of passage can very easily lead us astray, without much room for others. And rather than becoming this, Kiki’s arc largely involves her natural capacity for more hand-based services. While her mother is closer to a doctor/pharmacist-type, she is closer to a public service specialist. And while that may look less than flattering to some, there is something very sneaky and hopeful happening with this in mind. When she suddenly finds herself unable to use her magic abilities, it is no wonder that the broom she came flying into Kokori breaks..is her mother’s.

It is here, and with local artist, Ursula’s advice that even our greatest gifts will experience something of a block at times, that the road to maturity drifts into cruising speed. Kiki finds herself at her best and happiest when she is living up to her own instinctive ideals, rather than any fears she might have about the thoughts of others.

As with the breaking of the mother’s broom, the broom used to rescue airship fanboy/witch fanboy, Tombo from a nasty fate..belongs to an elder street sweeper. A “public servant”. Personal redemption comes from Kiki’s own passion for helping the people of Kokori. It’s a pretty solid tale in the telling that still finds ways to keep me active and enamored throughout.

Porco Rosso(1992), while still a truly personal work for Miyazaki containing some of his most sumptuous imagery and elegaic moments, seems to have lost some luster for me over the years. Hard to say why this is so, but upon this viewing it became evident that the tale of WWI fighter pilot ace, Marco Pagot, while as complex and politically dense as it is, suffers from a lack of a stable central thesis. It really is something of a kitchen sink affair, as Miyazaki struggled to make Porco into a loving tribute to the era, and a tale of personal redemption in a time fraught with change. With Porco, now living the cursed life of a pig after long deserting his life as an air force pilot, and now making a living on the Adriatic as a bounty hunter, the film shakily dances between sweet natured comedy, adventure, and romantic homage. And while much of it works magically (as most Ghibli films of the era did), there is a lack of focus that dogs a majority of the running time.

And yet at the same time, one of the film’s meatier themes is that of a life independent. Not unlike the shame Porco feels for having abstained from serving any nation, as well as the loss of his closest colleagues, it all feels like Kiki’s darker, more battle-worn sibling. Even as the previous film lauded the individual as part of a collective, Porco represents a search for life beyond the state. Miyazaki both praises the talents and honor of those who dedicated their lives to flight, but admonishes governments who would exploit it in the name of foggy politics and control. As Italy seems on the brink of another governmental shift, and the world economy is en route to great depression, taxes and allegiances are on the lips of all. All the while, pilots find themselves in this situation either scraping out a meager living as sky pirates, or as bounty hunters living on the fringes of this now rapidly changing society. Rivalries aside, hunters like Porco and pirates like the Mamma Aiuto gang seem culled from similar cloth. All well represented by all parties cooling their engines in peace at the Andriano bar, a place run by Porco’s lifelong friend and long-suffering love interest, Gina. With these air bound skirmishes growing ever more and more desperate, things exacerbate once the pirates opt to hiring American hot-shot, Curtis, in hopes of taking down the “red pig” once and for all. (Or at the very least, humiliate him..)

Upon losing what even wouldn’t constitute an actual air duel with the eager american, Porco is forced to make a run into fascist led Milan in hopes of repairing his beloved seaplane. So when he is surprised to learn that his long trusted plane engineering and construction genius, Piccolo is bereft of his usual help, it is in the shared labor of the feminine and the talents of his youthful american granddaughter, Fio, that Porco finds within him an unexpected spark. And while much of this is classic storytelling, a great deal of the film feels more interested in the details of the world than in any real character based storytelling. The main throughline, while relatively solid, is equally as happy to examine the the world around them, occasionally to mixed results. So when it comes time for the big rematch between Porco, and the american Rattlesnake, our attentions are recalibrated toward the fate of Fio, who in the event that our hero loses, must go to Curtis, who’s buffoonish aims seem to be mostly intent on getting hitched..even if to an underaged plane engineer.

But the worries Miyazaki has about his own talents and the way in which it is utilized post-success are evident during an important exchange between him and a former colleague-turned fascist ace, Ferrarin inside a movie theatre. As Ferrarin secretly informs Porco that the new government is actively buying off sky pirates, and actively rendering them obsolete, Porco remarks how the standard “Dog Vs. Pig” animation they are watching is lousy. Staying on message seems to be the program. This is only bolstered by Ferrarin’s respone that the animation is great. It’s well considered that Porco, is indeed the spirit of Miyazaki, ever dogged by powers that only see him as a company tool. Ever longing for the freedom to tell the stories he wishes, his way.  Now if only, the film could pick a theme before being merely one of several disparate ones. One could even argue that PR is something of a rail against the changing fates of animators throughout the 1980s. At any rate, there’s simply so much going on that it becomes a little tricky to suss out.

All this said, Porco Rosso remains one of Miyazaki’s most poetic and playful films. There’s no denying the power to entertain here. And as a work that lies in between the thoughtful, straightforward Kiki, and the oft-considered overbearing Princess Mononoke(1997), it’s still a gorgeous movie with a lot on its mind.

So in all, a memorable evening of some of the very best that commercial Japan has to offer, with an audience that was more than adequately receptive. So happy to see that the American Cinemateque is continuing to host these films over the next few weeks, with Takahata’s incredible Grave Of The Fireflies(1988) and Tomomi Mochizuki’s Ocean Waves(1993) tonight, ending with Miyazaki’s Oscar winning, Spirited Away(2001) on Thursday, March 20th. So if you’re in LA over the next few weeks, do give it a consider. The Egyptian remains one of my favorite cinemas, and this is a most exciting way to introduce these works to a whole new world of eyes.

As for the person I shared last night’s event with..I’d say we have a new convert.

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Bridging The Gap: Kill la Kill & The Fabric Of Exploitation

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Dear Diary,

Perhaps it is time to up and say that all this fighting and stripping might represent a shift in personal priorities. Not so much in the minds of those behind Kill la Kill per sé, but rather in my own. There was indeed a time when anime excess was something I could wholeheartedly get behind. “The more bugnuts insane, the better!”, I often thought. After all, there is something about the pure gut nature of the medium that is both dangerous and alluring to many admirers. But as one grows older, often it is depth of context that wins out over visual chutzpah. After all, what good is an experience without that element of thoughtfulness? What good is spectacle without a set of human conversations bursting out around the noise?

Make no mistake. Kill la Kill is on its face a tremendously dopey show. But don’t let that fool you for a second.

Now that we have come to the mid-point of Ryuko Matoi’s ultimate challenge within Honnouji’s grueling Natural’s Election gauntlet, it felt right to finally fess up and come to terms with this series’ paradoxical nature. And while I cannot pretend to pinpoint every fragment and crumb of the mad cacophony of symbolism that is this show, one can at least deduce that it is not as clear-cut as some might have surmised early on. The battling has been pretty nonstop, and our heroine continues to impress with her graceless, yet effective wins against the totalitarian academy’s Elite Four. On top of all this, the mystery behind Matoi’s scientist father’s demise, and the ultimate aim of school leader, Satsuki continue to remain foggy. But for all the hyper-simplicity of Kill la Kill’s storytelling battery, the sheer carnival of absurd battles in between is what offers up the most meat for viewers to gnaw. In here, the action is not a pretext for ideas brewing on the sidelines- the text is in the action.

And while we can definitely chart the last several episodes, and pilfer out a talk of recap for this post, it seems a whole lot more interesting to just dive headlong into the central conflicts and seek out just what the hell Imaishi & Nakashima seem to be making noise about. Looking back to my initial impressions, not much has changed since declaring the show a hyperactive savant’s half-hearted attempt at feminine empowerment. And even as some of the most devastating action moments from this show come at the hands of the female characters of the show, it’s often with this all-too-omnipresent streak of middle-school level lasciviousness. It’s pretty safe to say that the acts of the characters often say more than their words as each side of the conflict spout out virtue after virtue of their respective philosophies. And as on-the-sleeve as action comedies like this go, Kill la Kill offers up some effectively satirical sucker punches.

So let’s look at what we do know about the world of Honnouji, and the conflict that has made up most to all of KlK’s running time

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On its surface, the tale of delinquent schoolgirl, Ryuko Matoi’s two-fisted war to defeat Kiryuin’s regime of “uniformity” has been largely one of escalation. Starting off with merely her trusty, yet still mysterious half-scissor, Matoi’s reputation as something of a scrappy, yet devastating quantity has launched us directly into the caustic final circle. While it would be easy to just see the story as a simple good versus evil tale (something even Imaishi & Nakashima’s Tengen Toppa Gurren Lagaan played safely with), there is a surprising twist to our heroine’s rise that may be central to the series as a whole. Despite what we already know about her and her bond with the sentient “Kamui” seifuku known as Senketsu, there are still questions lingering as to what it is, and its true goals. Not to mention the fact that there are still those on the periphery who clearly also wish to see the tables turned, often masquerading as simple allies. And as a result, the battles have become increasingly taxing on nearly everyone.

Even as Ryuko has shown her mettle against theoretically hundreds of bizarre and desperate club members, little of this wouldn’t have come to pass without a lot of mutual exploitation. Movement in the series seems to be constantly at the whims of those willing to use others for their standing in the current order. While Ryuko uses Senketsu, her elder informant in turncoat teacher, Mikisugi (and his clandestine group of rebels, “Nudist Beach”!!) seems poised to use the duo for his own ends. Add this to nearly every major move Satsuki has made since frame one, and you have a culture of exploitation where both the unstoppable forces and immovable objects are in a constant state of strategic puppetry. It’s a sly thematic addition that undercuts a great deal of the show. Within the harsh, pyramid-like structure they are scrapping in, noone seems capable of coming off without looking a little parasitic.

The need to exploit in order to maintain the status-quo (or break it) is high in this series as Honnouji almost plays like the ultimate parody of otaku servitude. While we are indeed watching a show supposedly set in a high school, there are tons of potshots being fired at fictions the young must endure in the name of societal idealism. Be it by use of status, and name dropping as a means to get ahead, rig a game, or just plain circumvent it by way of hyperbolic fisticuffs, Kill la Kill seems eager to bite numerous feeding hands. Even the show’s initial conceit of having Ryuko and various other characters reduced to compromising half-nudity (or is it really “most nudity”?) hints at the exploitation anime companies have been forced to employ in hopes of maintaining what remains of an audience. One only need look at our hero’s reactions to all of this and imagine the animation staff feeling the same “are you kidding me?” manner as projects grow more and more desperate. Everything is at the edge of collapse, and this show’s landscape never lets us forget it.

We can see numerous shades of Japan’s competitive societal norms being lambasted by way of the show’s action and often unsubtle gag barrage. What really sends it all home is in how the aforementioned culture of exploitation makes itself so well known in what has become my favorite episode in #7. Without spoiling anything, this single episode parodies virtually every “perils of success” moral tale imaginable, culminating in one of the most satisfying fights in recent anime history. By making all characters fallible to the illusory nature of success on the bruised backs of the ordinary, we are given a critique on Japanese competitiveness that even rivals the work of one Takami Koshun. (It’s perhaps no accident that Ryuko’s proto-yankii nature is reminiscent of many 1980s stereotypes of working class teens.) Even her adversaries represent different shades of Japan’s “ganbare”/”shogannai” culture, complete with self-flagellating samurai spirits, and a need to mold the youth into the perfect infrastructural ideal. Even our heroine’s often bullish nature isn’t given a romantic treatment. She is often portrayed as inefficient, and ever rash about her strategies. But as adversaries grow increasingly intimidating, it is her openness to unorthodox thinking that often works. It is in her relationship with the scene stealing Mako and the rest of the Makenshoku family, that we are granted some semblance of an emotional core. Perhaps the bastion of faith she stands on in order to face the system on its own playing field. They are the everypeople of the series, doing their best in the maelstrom called their reality.

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But furthering this theory, is in what motivates alpha and omega as the story draws toward what should be a finale that could rival Gurren Lagaan’s mammoth climax. When looking closer at what society under Satsuki wants, versus others, plenty comes into focus. Where Satsuki sees solutions in plots within plots, all often in the name of fabric-like consistency, all Ryuko wants is some semblance of closure by way of the truth. She may have gained something of a new family through Mako’s simple-living clan, but it is in this need for understanding that all this crazy is endlessly unleashed upon her. And even as many fight and claw to gain stature within the world model that has been in place since Satsuki took power, there is often a question of what manner of world do others wish to create. So many here are well entrenched, and will do anything to climb the ladder that is dangling before them, whereas Ryuko would sooner break it into splinters. Not unlike the student council of Shoujo Kakumei Utena, a world unmade is hinted at if not explicitly stated. Both poles of this war seem to originate from homes with fragmented families, and yet could not be more different in approach. Micro versus Macro.

And while I am sure that Kill la Kill is not terribly interested in positing alternatives to this world of panic and wayward id, it is at the very least enamored with the idea that things are on the cusp of great change. Much like how I look at anime now versus a decade ago when more seemed to be better. One does not always have to play the game to win. And even when Imaishi seems poised toward making fans choke on a medium’s more cheeky natures, perhaps that is the real goal. The whole thing is like a gauntlet of frustration made manifest in an orgy of silly. While the show revels in its excesses like a junkie’s last great binge, there are fragments of a more pointed mind stewing beneath. A presence doing its best to keep the whole thing from going off a bridge in flames.

Never imagined a show featuring so much underboob would have so much to say about the current state of affairs, but there it is, diary. Now that the canvas has just been widened by the entrance of those likely behind Satsuki’s deep seated disdain for unbridled ambition, I seriously cannot help but wonder where the hell all of this leads.

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Through Older Lenses: The Promise Of Twilight Q (1987)

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Oh, for what could have been.

 

Anthology series are often such a rare recipe for even mild success that it’s a surprise to many when they do pop up. And in Japan, when such a concept is applied to the animated world, this becomes quadruply rare. Even after popular shows such as World Masterpiece Theater, and the like, the science fiction vignette concept certainly sounded like a perfect marriage. Especially in the latter 1980s, when the genre and the medium seemed at perfect sync with each other. So when looking back at the lost OVA series, Twilight Q, I am reminded of what potential might have been, and how certain animators saw it as a means to stretch their experimental wings- perhaps to its detriment. A defiantly literate concept, Q was the coming together of what would become something of a dream team of anime luminaries. Produced by a very young pre-Bandai Visual, and with only two episodes to its name, it remains something of a footnote in the history of these would-be legends.

 

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First Episode: Time Knot – Reflection

 

The first installment concerns teen girl, Mayumi who on vacation with a friend, discovers a near-intact camera on a beach with mysterious clues written all over. After attempting to develop pictures from a roll within the eater resistant casing, most is indecipherable save for one shocking image – one of her with a boy she has never met before. Troubled by this, her best pal’s big brother takes it upon himself to investigate the camera’s origins, only to discover that it is not of any preceding/present time frame! A very laid back, and almost poetic journey ensues as Mayumi (and in turn, the audience) is taken on a trip between eras that not only explain her role in all of this, but of Japan’s path toward ecological disaster. Written by longtime Oshii collaborator, Kazunori Ito, there are clear parallels to what would become a solid theme in his work, looking into a nation’s less than flattering past as a means to ensure young people like Mayumi some manner of clarity. While less science fiction than wisftul, Time Knot is presented in a more deceptively sunny, reflective manner than one would expect. And also contained within its very short running time, an almost stealthy level of meta-humor holding it all together.

 

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Ito, and director, Tomomi Mochizuki (Ranma 1/2, Umi Ga Kikoeru) take full advantage of the short’s sunny skies, and light-hearted musings to paint a portrait of prosperity on borrowed time. As Mayumi finds herself drawn even further into the mystery, there is almost a feeling as if it isn’t merely time that is being manipulated, but also reality. The implications of Mayumi’s world being a quasi-parody of anime’s overt compensation for reality, is a potent one if viewers are willing to take the trip. Even without it, there is plenty to chew on considering how brief the short is. On top of this, the presentation remains gorgeous.

And then run headlong into..the second and FINAL episode..

 

 

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Mystery Article File 538

What one could consider an odyssey into social isolation, and borderline obsessive insanity, 538 tells the tale of a lone detective who has found disturbing typed testimonial whilst investigating the connection between a recent rash of jumbo jet disappearances, and the lives of a man, and his toddler “daughter” in a disheveled apartment. And the closer we intently listen, the more confessional, and bizarre the tale becomes. From the very beginning, the totems of a particular anime voice are established loud and clear as we listen to the narration being read, and the revelations that this case has indeed been going on longer than many might imagine. Obsessions with endless meals of noodles, lack of human interaction, detailed descriptions of a life cloistered, and even imagery of JAL planes becoming scaled, breathing carp telltale the presence of the one and only Mamoru Oshii. And in classic form for the anime auteur, the findings in File 538 are less about aliens, espers, or time travelers, it is more of the surreality that is modern Japanese life.

 

Very much a spiritual follow-up to perhaps his most obtuse work, Tenshi No Tamago, 538 is much more concerned with atmospheric montage and rambling theory than perhaps Oshii’s most impenetrable works. As we are drawn into the lives of the aforementioned “man”, and his pantsless toddler child, are are also given glimpses into the hidden metropolitan. Parts of Tokyo that have become reclaimed, and often discarded whilst the economic engines of the era pretend that all is fine. There are even some challenging notions regarding Japan’s role in the contemporary asian sphere as we see both nature and human sprawl scroll across the screen. In many ways, the obsessions displayed in 538 are ones that would eventually become major components of Oshii’s more mainstream works to come (most notably the first PATLABOR film, which was clearly in the wings at this point). It’s clear that despite his yen for comedy, Oshii’s temperament had decidedly become more solemn, more sober in only a mere few years. 538 is a mostly forgotten, but important bridge between a famed director’s most well-defined poles.

 

 

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It’s also no wonder that the concept only lasted as long as it had. Even in the formative days of anime as global populist entertainment, this is perhaps as uncompromising as it gets. And while Twilight Q might not seem to be the best, most well-realized hidden treasure anime around, it is certainly one of the most interesting. As the opening warning in red states; This is a show that is capable of controlling your reality. And as a very brief visitor, I was certainly hooked

Oh yeah, and…Twilight Zone..Ultra Q..

Nice.

‘Dickwolves’ cheered at Penny Arcade Expo

Life, it may be said, is lived in fiction. If you got up and went to a job today, odds are that you did it for the money – itself a fiction, but backed by the government, which is another fiction. Your house and car physically exist, but your loans on them constitute promissory notes – financial fiction – owed to a corporation – a legal fiction. Somewhere in all this fiction we write narratives that explain what kinds of people we are, who we talk to, what we find good and evil, and how we live our lives.

The Penny Arcade controversy may be said to be the clash of competing fictions. What is Penny Arcade’s identity in the yet-ongoing ‘Dickwolves’ fight? Are they rabble-rousing hatemongers hell-bent on pushing a pro-rape agenda? Are they freedom fighters, trying to cling to their own ways of thought in an increasingly pressurized society? Or are they merely two guys who made a dumb joke? Twitter was ablaze yet again as this clip from PAX 2013 circulated (click to open video):

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“I think that pulling the dickwolves merchandise was a mistake.” – Mike “Gabe” Krahulik, artist of Penny Arcade

“One of these days he’s going to say something wrong to the wrong person and then suddenly, PAX won’t be a thing anymore.” – @DanielBriscoe, Fandom Press, a sentiment echoed by many online.

Perhaps it’s impossible to be for free speech – whether caricatures of George Bush, graphic violence and gore in anime and manga, girls with improbably large breasts, or Serrano’s Piss Christ – and to turn around and be for the censoring of speech and thought because one particular group of people you like is sacrosanct. The basic concept of free speech in art is: whether an artist’s speech is distasteful or tasteful should not control whether we as a society permit it to exist.

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“If jokes about violence, rape, aids, pedophilia, bestiality, drugs, cancer, homosexuality, and religion bother you then I recommend reading a different webcomic.” – Gabe

To Penny Arcade, it appears this is more or less a straightforward free speech issue. From their point of view, they say stupid stuff but they don’t mean harm by it; some of it is hilarious and some is offensive, and some might even be both. They’re crass and careless, but they are equally crass and careless with each other. In the above PAX 2013 panel video, they publicly joke about how if one of them dies, the other already has plans to spend the life insurance money! Sensitivity is clearly not something they are any good at.

Penny Arcade’s fans cheer them because they are cheering the idea that in a complex world of disproportionate reactions – a scary world where kids get in trouble for chewing pastries into the shape of guns – it’s okay to be yourself. It’s okay to break the rules of politeness, it’s okay to say socially unacceptable things, and it’s okay to make a comic about utterly juvenile humor juxtaposed with gaming references. They don’t understand what all the fuss is, and they don’t accept that a joke about the absurdity of RPG questing that uses rape as its “BAD END” has anything to do with real life rape. They want to live without having to worry about consequences for every dumb thing that comes out when they open their mouths.

Set against this are those who believe that culture is deliberate. To them, every word and thought must be carefully measured for fear of contributing to one repressive culture or another. In this particular case, that’s “rape culture,” and all of Penny Arcade’s bluster is nothing less than horrifying. This is the other story; the other version of events; the competing fiction. Those who believe in rape culture believe in a sort of semiotic butterfly effect, whereby constant mention of rape as a laudable act (“we raped the other team in LoL last night”) or as an item of humour desensitizes people and eventually contributes to the incidence of actual rapes.

It would be easy to call this difference one of liberalism vs. conservatism, but that would be false: the Dickwolves argument is a clash between one liberal paradigm (third-wave feminism) and another liberal paradigm (free speech)! To third-wave feminists, it is utterly shocking that someone would willingly choose to wear a Dickwolves shirt after the backlash. After all, even if others don’t agree with their way of looking at culture, it’s obvious they are horrified by it. Why would anyone willingly offend them?

“A moral panic is a public panic over an issue deemed to be a threat to, or shocking to, the sensibilities of ‘proper’ society… Where the moral panic involves a group whose members are conscious of their subordination, the denounced behavior may become a symbol of opposition and rebellion.” – RationalWiki

It has to be noted that third-wave feminists do not form a majority consensus in society at large; only in educational institutions and on the Internet – where liberalism holds sway – are they taste-makers. “Rebellion” against any standards they impose may therefore also be understood as a clash between online and offline standards.

Of course, moral panic in the abstract is regularly derided in the gaming community, because of its associations with video game censors like Jack Thompson. Penny Arcade itself publicly feuded with the now-disbarred lawyer in 2005. Perhaps this illustrates a valuable lesson about how people apply ideals. People get that moral panic is absurd when applied to something they instinctively find harmless or positive like gaming, but change the bugbear to something like hurtful speech, and suddenly they’re all in. After all, stereotypical video game nerds and anime otaku have a long and storied history of being verbally abused.

Will Penny Arcade spawn more controversies in the future?

“With me not being able to keep my mouth shut – I’m trying very hard to be better about that . . . When and where it’s OK to say the things that I think. When I do things or say things that hurt not just me but fourteen other people who rely on Penny Arcade for their livelihood, when I say something dumb to make somebody mad . . . that I can see happening again. I hope it doesn’t, but I know who I am.” – Gabe

There you have it. It looks like it will happen again, and they are aware of it to the point of being fatalistic. While Gabe and Tycho are incredibly crass and offensive, perhaps we can at least say that they are also incredibly honest about who they really are. Time will tell whether they are remembered as hatemongers, advocates of free speech, or guys making dumb jokes.

Bridging The Gap: Miyazaki Steps Down From Directing (Thank you..)

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I promise to be brief.

Personally speaking, the best one can wish for in regards to those who inspire and imbue us, is for them to seek (and hopefully find) truest happiness. Already several glances at today’s news, and here I am, hoping it is indeed true. Several hours into the morning, and the news of animation legend, Hayao Miyazaki announcing his retirement from feature direction has been bouncing across my screen like colored lights at a pachinko parlor. And while the animation fan community shares with the expected sad face emoticons and sentimental musings, the only thing that will come out from me as response is, “this had better be serious this time”. Much like another breakup announcement by The Cure, the retirement of this cartoon grandmaster has been one that has been long delayed, and is a relief to hear.

And it isn’t due to any direct disapproval, or wish for any manner of ill will, but rather that in the years post Mononoke Hime (1997), there simply hasn’t been the same manner of flare in Miyazaki’s works that have felt as strident, or as important. Often escalating in visual quality, and much less in narrative or spiritual immediacy, his films have become an almost thinly veiled lament over his inability to retire peacefully. There simply hasn’t been as much for him to say in a while outside of either screeds against contemporary Japan(Chihiro), or to merely dabble in less involved, less coherent tributes to the written works of others. And while there were truly some memorable images and scenes in the films post-1997, it often felt as if there was this lingering feeling that the last word had been said, and everything else was a perfunctory series of bitter and indifferent post-scripts.

But prior to all of this, his career with Studio Ghibli has remained and will remain an all-important benchmark in animation history. From his early television work, to his run with the now Disney-like icon of a wheelhouse, it will be hard to imagine another creative name who will have such a wide-reaching impact. His thematic and artistic imprint has grown to influence generations of visual story lovers, and likely will continue to for generations more. Even as word spreads that he may remain with Ghibli in some other supervisory capacity, it can be finally said without hint of irony, and in best supportive voice, “arigatou kantoku”. (Be free.)

ありがとう..

Pacific Rim: A Triumphant Ode To Anime’s Golden Age

Oh yeah. It's here..
Oh yeah. It’s here..

For those less familiar with many of the other things I tend to post on the internet, I also happen to share views of other forms of entertainment via The Wandering Kaijyu, a blog where I can often wax about films and projects both standard and weird. And I have long made it important to draw parallels between a lifelong love of genre, and works that often succeed beyond the fun, offering more thematic meat than some might expect. And what does any of this have to do with anime? Simple, really. The binding polymer between all these writings has always been a search for a healthy mixture of revelation and nuance. A means for the epic to be balanced alongside the personal. That increasingly elusive juice that binds many great tales of the fantastic. It is not enough that a film distract us, they also must speak to smaller, more intimate matters that concern on a plane akin to our own.

They need to connect.

Be it anime, film, play, book, painting, music, this is a grand mission shared by the collective whether conscious or not. And only a mere few works gel in ways that can honestly be considered important to a cultural landscape. That moment where adults and children can look back into their shared memories and conjure that rare sense of genuine, breathless awe. A touchpoint where grand myths make an indelible mark between generations.

And I’ll be damned if Guillermo Del Toro’s Pacific Rim doesn’t become one of them.

One part apocalyptic allegory, and one part massive tribute to anime and tokusatsu films of yesteryear, Pacific Rim tells the tale of humanity’s final gamble against a destructive onslaught of gargantuan monsters hailing from a fissure beneath the seas. Years into the seemingly incessant attacks by the well-dubbed, “Kaiju”, the people of Earth instill the Jaeger Program, an international force, utilizing mammoth robots in hopes of fighting back the inevitable. And while taking the fight to the kaiju had long proven successful, the tide was inevitably turned, leading to humanity opting to scrap the program in lieu of a last ditch plan to build walls of protection. Even as reports come in that even this option may very well be in vain, once celebrated Jaeger Program leader, Marshall Stacker Pentecost(Idris Elba) chooses to take his team and go it alone to seek out what remains of their now dwindling resources. And as the once hailed champions of humanity find themselves all but completely decimated, he chooses to tap former Jaeger pilot, Raleigh Becket(Charlie Hunnam) of the US class mecha, Gipsy Danger to suit back up years after a crippling loss that killed his brother & partner. Soon convinced to return with Pentecost to the Shatterdome(the final place of operations near Hong Kong), it is not long before Becket witnesses the full desperate scale of matters, as the once mighty Jaeger corps has recently dropped to a paltry four.

Now down to Russia’s Cherno Alpha (with team comprised of a husband and wife), China’s Crimson Typhoon (a hyper-articulated machine piloted by triplets), and Australia’s swiftly dangerous Striker Eureka (piloted by father & son, Herc & Chuck Hansen), Becket’s lack of sureness to return to the defense of the human race is tested by loss. One of the film’s greatest challenges to convey to an audience is easily the concept of The Drift; a truly Evangelion-esque concept of psychic bonding between person and machine. Only this time, in order for a Jaeger to truly reach full fighting potential, a pair of pilots require a most intimate and unusual co-mingling of memories and psyche. And since Becket’s brother was his ultimate expression of this, his faith that something that strong could ever come again is in deep doubt. That is until he meets Mako Mori(Rinko Kikuchi), a young survivor of the first kaiju attacks and long adopted ward of Pentecost, who naturally does whatever in his power to not allow this duo to come to be, even when the bond gels so naturally. The conflicts between what remains of this final push back by humankind is at the core of the film, and is ultimately Pacific Rim’s beating heart.

A tribute that never forgets the fundamentals..

So when it finally comes time for viewers to experience the much-anticipated battles between humanity bearing mechanized behemoths, and an army of marauding giants from the sea, the film goes into full-blown anime mirthland. These are not merely battles that pull back and allow us a complete view of the action from a safe space, these are fight scenes, willing to dig deep, and grant us a pilot’s side seat, confusion and all as storm waters clash upon both sets of titans. It’s a truly bold and impressive move by Del Toro, and Industrial Light & Magic, who seek out an expansion beyond the days of Japanese SFX pioneers such as Eiji Tsuburaya, and yet never forget their roots. Covering both the systematic and the human, the camera, light work, choreography and soundtrack offer up one of the most impressive melange of its kind ever made. We are in there with them, and we feel every slug, drop, splash & crash. And the drama of each battle is kept fully in check as we are never neglected in understanding where we are, and what is happening, which is pretty rare. It is a bravura thrill ride experience in the best sense of the cliche. Even when you are done recovering your jaw from your seat, there’s still more. The Battle Of Hong Kong alone would make for an impressive climax, and even so, this isn’t the end.

At the center of all the spectacle onscreen, is Del Toro’s and screenwriter, Travis Beacham’s contention that despite our greater gains in technology, the most important component of survival is unfettered human connection. And it is a constant throughout the piece as we are whisked from location to location, continuously reminded of a need for all of us to reach out, and allow for others to come in despite our respective situations. The thread of Becket and Mori, and their development also does wonders in this as it avoids the pratfalls of oh so many summer blockbusters. It ditches the obvious in the name of making its point succinctly clear. Intimacy and understanding between disparate souls is both miraculous, and necessary, and their arc is explored beautifully in almost dead-on Sunrise anime style. Even when things are super generalized (the film is still largely written broadly for younger people, and is not meant to be taken as seriously as so many recent big releases- think Star Wars: A New Hope, and you’re about there), there is a sincerity that runs through that is incredibly rare in movies of this scope nowadays. Strangely enough, I don’t think I have felt this way about a movie since 2008’s Speed Racer. Beyond a need to cash in on what some industry names love about Japanese pop culture, there is also deep-rooted admiration for that world’s often unerring straight-forwardness, which is refreshing for Hollywood film. (What that says about us as a culture? I leave to you.) For those unfamiliar with the works of Guillermo Del Toro, this might very well be the spell that spurs one to look at his back catalogue. He’s a director who knows his fantasy as well as his monsters. And he applies it here with a reverence that is impeccable.

And boy, what reverence!

To think that we are in an era where we could see a film that strives to pay homage to everything from Go Nagai to Hideaki Anno, and still retain its own unique soul, is a miracle in and of itself. While not as interested in playing “spot-that-reference” as say..The Matrix, there is plenty hidden despite the film’s incredible pacing and urgency. From weaponry right out of Voltes V, Mazinger-Z, and others, to some thrilling new takes on giants almost breaking out in professional wrestling moves ala Ultraman, there is much to be mined for those versed in the culture, but does not discount those new to this particular realm. From the design of the previously mentioned Shatterdome, with its upright hoists, carrying each respective Jaeger, to their launch setups that evoke so much Evangelion, it is all clearly made with so much love and understanding of the mediums/genres, that the mind boggles at how any of this was produced and not excised by some studio. Heck, we even have a fist-fight between “brothers” that smacks of oh-so many classic 1970’s rivalries between comrades. In a world post Speed Racer, all of this is brought to life much in the spirit of the film’s final mission against the monstrous hordes; with serious passion and a go-for-broke attitude. Heck, even Hunnam’s performance which many may consider to be hammy, is done so in the manner of many a Bang Zoom! dub. It all feels deeply intentional. Del Toro has been granted full control here, and he plays it his love for all things mecha melodrama like a final shot at the title. He spares us nothing, and it is a pure thrill.

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And as much as I would like to lay it all on Del Toro for making this what it is, there is a sense of family that persists in his film shoots that clearly happened here. Even as an artist himself, Del Toro surrounds himself with some of the more passionate names in the industry, and it shines brightly here from crew to cast. The overall look and palette of the film takes a cue from a mix of Blade Runner and previous Del Toro visual motifs by way of art directors, Patrick Neskoromny, Carol Spier and others. The entire look and feel of the film is unlike anything I have seen before, and it is a large collaboration of fantastic artisans that went allowing Pacific Rim to feel and pulsate with life as it does. The world building is sparse in its edit, but dense enough to imply a comic-style world on the brink. And on top of all this, the kaiju themselves are truly unique, and utterly terrifying in their morphology and abilities.The entire affair is harmonious in the name of the film’s emotional core which is never lost, even as the film’s action reaches often crazy levels.

Adding to the old-fashioned comic flavor of the film are fun performances by Charlie Day, Burn Gorman, and of course, Del Toro regular, Ron Perlman, who’s role as the successful-yet-slimy kaiju parts merchant, Hannibal Chau is memorable enough to warrant his own movie. Elba’s Pentecost is the classic conflicted leader who must remain a fixed point even as things are crumbling all around humanity. It’s a meaty and occasionally fun performance that more than makes up for his truncated turn in last year’s PROMETHEUS. But the real discovery here, is the winning performance of Rinko Kikuchi as the reserved, yet noble Mori. A character that could so easily have been treated like so many others in previous genre works. She is portrayed as a person long seeking some manner of closure for the loss of her family due to an early kaiju attack, but up until now has had no real way to seek it. Now on the cusp of a choice that could change her fortune forever, Kikuchi plays Mori as a person yearning for even-earned connection, something she has yet to achieve on her own. This is not about being a love-interest, this is about identifying with others who share her sorrows despite a shared fighting spirit inside. It is a memorable turn among many impressive ones.

But enough.

Looking back at the history of my writings regarding movies of the fantastic, and celebrating the world’s yearning for shared myths, I can honestly say that only a strict few can ever be considered evergreen moments. And when each of them hit, it was often unexpected, and game changing in regards to movie trends and overall attitudes. For those looking for something a little more nuanced and open-ended, this isn’t such a film. It simply doesn’t intend to do more than it does, and what it does, it succeeds wholeheartedly. I am sincerely envious of today’s youth, growing up in a time where Pacific Rim exists. This is a film constructed out of true love for things I continue to hold close to my heart, and it pulls it all off with sincerity and energy unlike any other film I have seen this year. It knows and wields the hot blooded passion of the past, and holds open its arms in hopes for futures rife with potential. Most importantly, it all retains a humanity that is becoming all too rare in big releases. We don’t get experiences like this in theatres very often, so make sure to share this one with anyone you connect well with, be it family or friends. A heartfelt bridge between gaps beats loudly through Pacific Rim, and it is one not to be missed.

To hell with adaptations. This is how one does it.

Aku No Hana : An Assessment Of The Impulse

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And so with self-expulsion comes long-sought intention. Flirtation with the unfamiliar, and an attraction to all things id. What can be perceived as broken and dangerous to some, just might be liberation for others. Finally caught up with the misadventures of Takao & Nakamura when matters became abundantly transparent that the entire series has in fact revolved around a very simple concern that plagues many a creative talent; whether the work is endemic to a continuing, organic process, or merely additional fodder for mass consumption. (and that high school life itself can be seen as a working analogue for this) A merging of form and function is at the center of this affair, and it has little to do with maintaining a vanilla existence – which is often everything that anime safely represents ad-infinitum.

 

While over the course of several weeks already, we have seen our lead character’s indiscretion become something of a spark for all manner of internal conflict. From the onset, we are privy to his bookish nature, his curiosity for the darker corners of life’s domain. And yet we are also allowed to understand his need to be embedded within the collective in some manner, no matter how slight in his adoration of Saeki, a classmate with which he cannot help but feel represents something of a sanctuary in a world he sees rotting from all corners. How funny it all is when the caustically antisocial Nakamura enters his life, and sees Takao as some form of externalizing force for her rage, something far more volatile than his own concerns. How strange it is then, that the show has done quite a spirited job at offering attractive glimpses at both roads Takao can choose for himself. Saeki (and in turn, his mother) representing a domestic world packed with sincerity amongst so much data defect, and conformity. Whereas Nakamura is an unwitting emissary of a much-required deviation from this world. A kindred which is using a bevy on repressed angst, and emotion to whatever end. While both have their respective dangers, they also carry with them some manner of very real desires, ever at conflict with one another.

 

There also seems to be an unspoken choice which is implied by his subsequent actions throughout the story that is never verbalized, and yet seems on the edge of virtually every rash decision; that expression manifests as it will, whether the bearer of such feelings recognize them or not. That the outlet of art is often one of compulsion, and not as much a matter of practicality.

 

A facsimile versus an authentic portrait. A photograph, or a personally nuanced drawing? This is where Aku No Hana resides as of episode 10. In this series, form and function are paramount, and as our leads struggle to best grasp what it is they truly wish for, while it won’t always be pretty, it is perhaps in the name of all that it is to be young that it be as ungraceful as humanly possible. Even when one wishes to look away, there is something undeniably true about a collective sigh versus a scream. And even when a reviewer cannot agree with the choices of a character, there is also an implicit understanding of life within certain guidelines that occasionally requires aberrant types to balance out the larger equations.

 

Many of my own personal inspirations have opined that the creative impulse is something embedded within all of us, yet not all of us feel it knocking as loudly as it does with others. Pop music icon, Bjork once even stated that her shifts in musical tone have been so not because of some need for her work to be impenetrable, but because of a deeply rooted compulsion to do so. That these things spring forth as they will, and WILL manifest one way or another. It becomes less a matter of economics as it is one of lava that is primed to escape the crust, ever closer to bursting. That a minor few find themselves in this predicament, often very early in life, and is often something that mainstream society isn’t willing to accept, or is adamant about stamping out. The Takaos and Nakamuras of the world, for all their unspoken pains, have a need to produce, to quantify and expose their findings, society be damned. And while they flirt endlessly with ideas that are on a surface misanthropic and strange, could the alternative provide a reasonable, honest equivalent?

 

A nasty paradox..

 

While so many detractors have complained regarding the show’s presentation and pace, it is with a happy heart that I look at views such as this with fondness, as if I once knew a time when such feelings were as natural as breathing. To be confronted with something this stark, this honest, it is often the last thing many fan-types find themselves either interested in, or willing to submit themselves to. This series demands to be seen on its own terms, and that in and of itself is worth shouting about. The choices are more than clear at this point, and to imagine that we have a show like this airing right now is akin to a miracle. It simply shouldn’t be happening – and that..is invigorating.

Sony Entertainment rocks E3, declared the winner by the Internet

Editorial

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After Microsoft’s spectacular blunder of a press conference last month, people were already saying that the PlayStation 4 was going to blow away the Xbox One.  And even after Microsoft tried to claw its way back from the hole they dug themselves into, with a decent showing of new games earlier today, Sony took full advantage of their competition’s previous stumble and blasted even further ahead, leaving Microsoft to eat their dust… Gran Turismo style.

And all with just three simple announcements.

1)      PlayStation 4 will play used games with no restrictions.

2)      PlayStation 4 does not have to be online.  Ever.

3)      PlayStation 4 will be $399.99.

It was the first two of these announcements where Microsoft epically opened their mouth and inserted their foot last month.  At today’s conference, they tiptoed around these issues and (smartly) focused on games to try not to raise the ire of the blogosphere.  Sony, on the other hand, while not giving a perfect conference, unveiled the PS4 and ended it with a three punch TKO sending Xbox One to the mat.

The conference started slow, with CEO Jack Tretton pushing the PSVita and PS3. While I appreciate that the PS3 is not being flatlined right away, I found it odd there was no announced price cut for the Vita.  Sony’s handheld is really suffering in sales at the moment, and a price cut would be a push in the right direction.  Also, for a system that has no killer app, the new games announced for it just didn’t excite me, or anyone else in the audience from what I could tell.  Instead, we are told how great Skype looks on Vita.  I don’t want to buy a handheld game system to use Skype.  My phone, laptop, PC, and toaster oven all have Skype on it.  I want killer games. I loved my PSP. I want to love Vita too. Give me a reason to love it, Sony.

After Vita, we were treated to a few fun announcements for PS3.  Puppeteer looks great.  Rain’s design has me intrigued.  And Gran Turismo 6? It’s for PS3, not PS4? Ok. Looks pretty, I suppose.

On to the meat and potatoes of the conference, where we finally got to meet the new Sony Parallelogram… er PS4.  First impressions (other than the parallelogram gag) were it looks kind of like the Xbox One.  It’s a black box.  Maybe the designers of both systems went to the same screening of 2001: A Space Odyssey before they went to the drawing board?  Also did you know the PS4 will play movies, does networking apps, and will do other movie things and blah, blah, blah, blah… SHOW ME GAMES!

Then the clouds parted and a beam of light shined through.  Someone was listening to me.  First out of the gate was what appeared to be a Steampunk infused Zombie/Monster game called The Order 1886.  Just the trailer was shown, not gameplay, but I definitely got a “Left 4 Dead in a Steampunk Victorian Era” vibe from it.  Also, airships.  Airships are cool.  The Order 1886 is part of a reported 20 new Sony IPs to be released within the first year of the PS4’s lifespan.  Some others include Killzone, Driveclub, Infamous, and Knack.

Moving on to the independent scene, Sony smartly announced that indie developers will be able to self-publish their games on PSN. They then proceeded to knock it out of the park showcasing a ton of these smaller titles, each with its own individual quirks and eye catching gimmicks. I will definitely be keeping my eyes on these, in particular Transistor and Mercenary Kings.

Now for third parties, where better to start off than with the current kings of disappointment, Square-Enix.  Director Tetsuya Nomura appears on screen to talk about Final Fantasy Versus 13, yet again.  How many years has it been since they announced this?  I mean seriously, Square.  Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me.  Fool me three times… wow, that game looks amazing.  Is that actual game play footage?  Holy shit, is that Leviathan!?  No, no, no, there is no way it’s going to be this good.  It’s too good to be true.  Wait, what?! It’s not Final Fantasy Versus 13 anymore?  It’s Final Fantasy 15?!

Ahem.  Sorry about that.  Slight geek-out.  I promise it won’t happen again– Holy shit, Kingdom Hearts 3?!

And that’s when I blacked out for a few minutes.  I have been a die-hard Final Fantasy fan since I began gaming as a wee little Daniel, but it’s no secret Square’s recent endeavors have left me cold.  These trailers awakened my sleeping inner Square fan and made me feel all tingly and strange, as I’m sure it did to many of my fellow disenchanted FF franchise lovers.

After this, things were kind of a euphoric blur.  There was something about Assassin’s Creed, Watch Dog, and Mad Max I think.   All very exciting, especially Watch Dog.  Then Jack Tretton returned to the stage with his “Eat it, Microsoft” speech.  PS4 will have no DRM and fully supports used and rent/lent games.  The PS4 does not have to be online at all in order to work properly.  There was one minor hiccup, where it was implied that you would have to subscribe to PlayStation Plus to play multi-player games online, but I think we can forgive that.  Besides, Microsoft has done that from day one on the Xbox360, but still, it’s a small step backwards for Sony.

The speech was followed by a long-ish demo detour through Bungie’s new game, Destiny, and then they announced the PS4 price. $399.99. And internet exploded. It was the final KO punch of E3, with Sony knocking Microsoft (who had earlier announced an Xbox One price of $499.99) down for the count.

And that was it.  The execs dropped the mic and left the stage.  Sony was declared the winner of E3 by… pretty much everyone.

But wait… hey guys come back. You didn’t say when the system was coming out?  Later this year, but when exactly?  Guys?  Hey guys?

Oh well, I’m sure we will find that out soon enough.

So, fellow otaku and gamers, what do you think?  Decisive win for Sony?  Or is it still up in the air?  Let us know.  Anime Diet wants to hear your impressions so far.

 

Daniel is also very excited about the announced sequel to Mirror’s Edge, but since it wasn’t part of the Sony Press conference there was nowhere to mention it.

Anime Diet + Lacoste LIVE: Wednesday May 29, 7-9 PM!

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We are proud to announce that on Wednesday, May 29, 7-9 PM, we will be taking part in Lacoste’s NYC launch party for their new Osamu Tezuka inspired clothing and shoe line! Gendomike will be giving a half hour talk about Tezuka, the history of anime and manga in America, and the influence it’s had on culture (including clothing and fashion).

We’re really excited about this, and we invite everyone to come, especially our East Coast and NYC fans! Again, this it’s Wednesday night, at Lacoste’s Soho Boutique on 541 Broadway, New York City:


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Tell everyone you know who might be interested to join the party! There will be snacks, food, and drink available.

More to come in the next couple of days! See you there.

Bridging The Gap BULLETIN: The Anime Sols Experiment

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After what seemed like years since the anime streaming market reached something of a cooling point, the week was aglow with news that there was more than one bold newcomer aboard, ready to challenge the current model in ways few others have yet to venture. As recently mentioned, the Daisuki concept and site represents a bold shift in how anime is ready to be considered and marketed to fans overseas with plenty of recent and even perhaps new series. So when folks at Yomiuri (and the help of some unexpected sources) begin working with many long-heralded anime studios in what is a most ambitious move, it might be best to take heed. Anime Sols has indeed arrived, and by way of a Kickstarter-like streaming model, could be the godsend many fans (young and elder) have been longing for.

Initial rumblings regarding this concept were made a little over a year ago, when Sam Pinansky made an appearance on the Anime News Network’s ANNCast, where he leaked a few tiny details regarding an unprecedented effort on the part of several celebrated anime studios to bring die-hard favorites streaming to the world. By the use of dedicated pledges from fans all over, the vision is to fund a prospective dvd release for each featured series in box sets of 13 episodes, each with their own unique monetary goal. Pinansky has since reappeared on ANNCast as well as AWO this last week with some fun results. Well worth the listen!

For more details as to how it all works..

Having just begun earlier this week, the Anime Sols website is already host to several classic titles long elusive to American fans, including Black Jack TV, Ninja Senshi Tobikage, Yatterman, New Yatterman, Aoi Blink & Creamy Mami!

And more updates are under way.

Not going to water any of this down, I couldn’t be more excited about this opportunity for fans to step up. There are worlds of goodness that stateside anime lovers have yet to truly explore, and this is a terrific way to fall in love with a cherished medium all over again.

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Daisuki, a Studio-Backed Anime Streaming Service: First Look and Interview

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A new entrant into the legal international anime streaming scene has arrived—Daisuki. What makes Daisuki unique is that it enjoys the direct backing and co-production of several major Japanese animation studios, namely Aniplex, Sunrise, Toei Animation, TMS, and NAS. (In this it is similar to an analogous service launched by several major Japanese manga publishers, the now defunct J-Manga.) Launch titles include Madoka Magica, Lupin III, Gundam Seed, Prince of Tennis, and One Piece, and they have also posted a survey to help decide which titles to add next. Besides streaming anime for free, they also have plans to develop merchandise available for purchase, with a launch giveaway campaign to start.

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As of now, the streaming works smoothly and ad-free, and for Madoka it uses the same Aniplex translation and video as seen already on Crunchyroll. User registration—which is not required to watch—had some hiccups, but according to the official Twitter, the matter is being addressed. (For the record, I got my confirmation email within 10 minutes, so it’s probably already resolved.)

Interview

We got a chance to ask Eri Maruyama, Daisuki’s International Business Development representative, some questions about the service, its goals, and how it sees itself in a field that already has legal services like Crunchyroll and Funimation.

AD: Describe the genesis of the Daisuki idea—how did the decision to form this group to distribute anime digitally in America directly come about?

Maruyama: It was a kind of natural development since each of the companies started to think the same thing: one legal platform from Japan directed at overseas fans to provide their content. By the way, DAISUKI will be available world wide.

AD: Is there a monthly fee or is it pay per download? What are the proposed rates?

Maruyama: DAISUKI.net is a streaming service. Basically you can watch all Animes for free, some premium content will be fee-based.

AD: Some of the titles proposed, such as Madoka Magica and One Piece, are already available through legal streaming from Crunchyroll. Does this mean that CR or other legal streaming services that current carry Daisuke-hosted titles will lose their streaming license? Does Daisuke see itself as competing with those services?

Maruyama: No, they may continue their service. The streaming rights at DAISUKI are non-exclusive rights since our main purpose is not to get exclusive users for DAISUKI but to provide legal material. So, as long as fans are watching anime on other legal sites, that’s absolutely ok. We don’t see us in a direct competition with other sites. Rather would we wish to fight effectively together against piracy.

AD: What advantages will Daisuke bring to fans that they cannot get from other legal services? (For instance, since there is direct studio backing, will they all be immediate simulcasts without delays?)

Maruyama: We are planning to simulcast series. Moreover we are able (thanks to the direct connection to the studios and companies) to provide exclusive footage like making-of material or video messages of creators, voice actors and so on.

AD: With the goods/merchandising arm of Daisuki, is the plan primarily just to import related merchandise from Japan, or to also perhaps create overseas-unique items for sale as well?

Maruyama: we are still in the planning phase, but there will be definitely some exclusive items only available at the DAISUKI web-store.

AD: Recently an analogous digital distribution channel begun by several large Japanese manga publishers, J-Manga, folded. How does Daisuki intend to ensure the growth and success of the venture in an industry that is going through many transitions and challenges today?

Maruyama: It was a pity that J-Manga had to close down. The battle against piracy is indeed hard. At DAISUKI you can watch most of the content for free. We believe that overseas fans would pick the legal option if the conditions are the same. Hopefully, they will like DAISUKI and our service.

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