Aku No Hana : An Assessment Of The Impulse

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And so with self-expulsion comes long-sought intention. Flirtation with the unfamiliar, and an attraction to all things id. What can be perceived as broken and dangerous to some, just might be liberation for others. Finally caught up with the misadventures of Takao & Nakamura when matters became abundantly transparent that the entire series has in fact revolved around a very simple concern that plagues many a creative talent; whether the work is endemic to a continuing, organic process, or merely additional fodder for mass consumption. (and that high school life itself can be seen as a working analogue for this) A merging of form and function is at the center of this affair, and it has little to do with maintaining a vanilla existence – which is often everything that anime safely represents ad-infinitum.

 

While over the course of several weeks already, we have seen our lead character’s indiscretion become something of a spark for all manner of internal conflict. From the onset, we are privy to his bookish nature, his curiosity for the darker corners of life’s domain. And yet we are also allowed to understand his need to be embedded within the collective in some manner, no matter how slight in his adoration of Saeki, a classmate with which he cannot help but feel represents something of a sanctuary in a world he sees rotting from all corners. How funny it all is when the caustically antisocial Nakamura enters his life, and sees Takao as some form of externalizing force for her rage, something far more volatile than his own concerns. How strange it is then, that the show has done quite a spirited job at offering attractive glimpses at both roads Takao can choose for himself. Saeki (and in turn, his mother) representing a domestic world packed with sincerity amongst so much data defect, and conformity. Whereas Nakamura is an unwitting emissary of a much-required deviation from this world. A kindred which is using a bevy on repressed angst, and emotion to whatever end. While both have their respective dangers, they also carry with them some manner of very real desires, ever at conflict with one another.

 

There also seems to be an unspoken choice which is implied by his subsequent actions throughout the story that is never verbalized, and yet seems on the edge of virtually every rash decision; that expression manifests as it will, whether the bearer of such feelings recognize them or not. That the outlet of art is often one of compulsion, and not as much a matter of practicality.

 

A facsimile versus an authentic portrait. A photograph, or a personally nuanced drawing? This is where Aku No Hana resides as of episode 10. In this series, form and function are paramount, and as our leads struggle to best grasp what it is they truly wish for, while it won’t always be pretty, it is perhaps in the name of all that it is to be young that it be as ungraceful as humanly possible. Even when one wishes to look away, there is something undeniably true about a collective sigh versus a scream. And even when a reviewer cannot agree with the choices of a character, there is also an implicit understanding of life within certain guidelines that occasionally requires aberrant types to balance out the larger equations.

 

Many of my own personal inspirations have opined that the creative impulse is something embedded within all of us, yet not all of us feel it knocking as loudly as it does with others. Pop music icon, Bjork once even stated that her shifts in musical tone have been so not because of some need for her work to be impenetrable, but because of a deeply rooted compulsion to do so. That these things spring forth as they will, and WILL manifest one way or another. It becomes less a matter of economics as it is one of lava that is primed to escape the crust, ever closer to bursting. That a minor few find themselves in this predicament, often very early in life, and is often something that mainstream society isn’t willing to accept, or is adamant about stamping out. The Takaos and Nakamuras of the world, for all their unspoken pains, have a need to produce, to quantify and expose their findings, society be damned. And while they flirt endlessly with ideas that are on a surface misanthropic and strange, could the alternative provide a reasonable, honest equivalent?

 

A nasty paradox..

 

While so many detractors have complained regarding the show’s presentation and pace, it is with a happy heart that I look at views such as this with fondness, as if I once knew a time when such feelings were as natural as breathing. To be confronted with something this stark, this honest, it is often the last thing many fan-types find themselves either interested in, or willing to submit themselves to. This series demands to be seen on its own terms, and that in and of itself is worth shouting about. The choices are more than clear at this point, and to imagine that we have a show like this airing right now is akin to a miracle. It simply shouldn’t be happening – and that..is invigorating.

4 thoughts on “Aku No Hana : An Assessment Of The Impulse”

  1. I don’t know, this Kasuga is strange, he wants both heaven and hell, while most of us want only heaven. He dates a dream girl while wearing her buruma under his pants! That doppelganger scene, Kasuga’s mefisto is also wearing Saeki’s buruma, which was really hilarious! Heaven and hell are separated, even Christian myth is like that, but this anime, heaven and hell are jumbled together.

    I’m waiting for Fanime article that actually interviewed the director of Aku No Hana.

  2. That’s the delicious paradox, isn’t it? What many of us choose to call heaven might just be hell for our protagonists. Which is specifically why it is vital that a show like this expose such fallacies. While most anime adheres to the collective, this is a work that is willing to call forth a more difficult series of questions regarding what our desires are, and what it means to compromise our baser natures. Kasuga cannot have it both ways, which is precisely why it turns our perverse. For him to truly find his own personal heaven, he must expel himself from his false one. They are only jumbled because a shared heaven isn’t exactly a happy one. Moral of the story ; express honestly, or face the demons that arise with our without our permission.

    1. It’s a love story. Kasuga thinks he knows everything. Then he falls in love. And… he knows nothing. More infinite than art, love is infinitely more mysterious/impulsive.

  3. The beauty is that this goes both ways. The problems lie in how he finds himself unable to grasp a world that he truly, deeply has no understanding or acceptance of. He found himself enamored with the mundane, only to realize that it wasn’t a completeness factor he required.

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