Berserk Q&A Panel w/Eiko Tanaka Liveblog

Viz Media and Dark Horse Comics presents the CEO of Studio 4C, Eiko Tanaka, talking about the new Berserk anime film trilogy, the first of which premieres tonight for American audiences.

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18.39

Closing up with their Geek Week tribute video. That’s it for this liveblog!

18.37

Also new streaming announcement: D-Frag! Air date TBD

18.37

New streaming simulcasts for winter: Noragami, Inari, Konkon, Koi Iroha, and Maken-Ki! S2. The first one is Sunday at 8 AM.

18.35

Tomorrow’s Space Dandy premiere will have the dub ADR Director and Ian Sinclair, the English voice of Dandy. Looks like it will be the dub.

18.32

Space Dandy promo. I think we are hearing the OP here in this trailer….

18.32

Funi is doing the Evangelion 3.33 showings…it’s playing next weekend in LA. Might go.

18.31

“Ever get to the end of an anime and feel really sad? Don’t have to worry about it…” –MC on One Piece

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Next: One Piece S5. Even the MC seems a little bit tired of One Piece…or at least announcing yet another release.

18.27

Looking at the remaster, what seems to have happened is that it looks a little bit cleaner (and blown up to 16;9). It doesn’t really change anything though. The Evangelion remaster though really did seem to make a difference…

18.25

Apparently DBZ is being re-released on BD as well. A remaster of a remaster?

18.25

The MC promises us “I Love Boobies” (Space Dandy) stickers tomorrow at the Funi booth…

18.24

Next: Aesthetica of a Rogue Hero. “From the studio behind Queen’s Blade.” of course.

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Fairy Tail movie Phoenix Princess is next. Question: is this the series that’s going to pick up the slack from Naruto and Bleach when they are played out?

18.20

“Feel the Urge to Merge” LOL #AquarionEVOL #Funimation #otakonvegas

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Aquarion EVOL is next. For some reason I never finished this either, even though I thought it was hilarious.

18.16

Next: Wolf Children. Been meaning to see this. Missed the theater screening of this… #Funimation #OtakonVegas

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Next: One Piece Strong World. Apparently one of the few things they can even release on BD… #Funimation #OtakonVegas

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Next: Binbogami ga! (Good Luck Girl) (Note none of these are new licenses.) #Funimation #OtakonVegas

18.09

Upcoming new release: Akira re-release on BD. Trailer. #Funimation #OtakonVegas

18.07

Preview of the #Funimation show. (Are these being echoed on Twitter?) #Funimation

18.04

They’re talking about the Elite Video Subscription. I was a former subscriber, and since the site has improved a lot… #Funimation

18.02

Came in a bit late, but it looks like there hasn’t been any major announcements yet. #OtakonVegas #Funimation

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And that’s it!

20.04

The desire to create new things comes from childhood, when they see something genuinely affecting and creative, unimaginable things.

20.03

He admits that a lot of what he’s made probably shouldn’t be seen by kids 🙂 but he does want them to see death, violence, and even to feel pain–not bland stuff. To grow up with creativity.

20.02

Q: how do you think anime has influenced Japanese culture?

20.01

I interject: it wouldn’t be like a Psycho Pass would it? I made him laugh!

20.00

If he had to choose one technology: since we have hackers writing viruses, malware, etc., which are “invisible,” it would be awesome to have tech to stop them before they happen.

19.58

Which technologies would you want to have for yourself as depicted in GitS? (He didn’t answer this one before.)

19.56

The story in Arise is something he always wanted to do. With this one, Shirow wrote the plot, but the script was written by a novelist, who has sold a lot of work.

19.53

Ishikawa has figures: Arise played on 20 screens for 2 weeks, but it earned 100 million dollars. Yes, dollars, not yen. GitS is still popular.

19.51

Q: some have believed that GitS is more popular in the West than in Japan. Is this your perception, and with Arise, was there a conscious decision to try to reach an international audience from the start?

19.49

The message he wants to convey is: if you don’t give up, your dream will come true.

19.48

Then again, Miyazaki’s latest movie this summer, he’s making one more aimed at adults–a romantic drama. (This is the one with Hideaki Anno as the main protagonist…)

19.46

Q: do you see anime moving forward as a medium into places like the Cannes Film Festival? (GitS: Innocence was the first anime film there.) A: People like Miyazaki are the main face of Japan’s animation to the world…and he thinks anime is for kids.

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He talked to Shirow 5 years ago about what he calls a “pendulum psychology”: technology may advance, but humans go back and forth in their attitude about it. Like how watches still have dials even now.

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Ishikawa really reminds me of Kenji Kamiyama (the last GitS director): he really likes to talk about ideas…for a long time…

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A: It was Shirow who studied these things like crazy, with all the possiblities of the future. he took the ones that were the most plausible over the next 50 years.

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Q: Do you think the technologies in GitS will become real one day, and which ones would you like to adopt for yourself?

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They did anticipate some criticism, but that people would come around in time.

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As an animator, he has the ability to change drawings, unlike many directors. And he changed a lot in Arise.

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A: the feel of a show can really be influenced by the choice of director; this is the third director of the GitS franchise. This one is an animator.

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Q: was the fan backlash to Arise a surprise, or something you anticipated?

19.31

He asks us a question: people in Japan didn’t seem as excited about Yamato 2199 as people in America? Why is that? (Folks from east and west coast respond that everyone who’s seen it has been blown away.)

19.29

There are still contractual hurdles in releasing Yamato 2199 in America.

19.28

Q&A now beginning. First question is about Yamato…

19.26

LOL—he compares current fans from the ones he remembered from 15 years ago. People are so much younger and not as “big” anymore…

19.24

Now he’s talking about Kick-Heart, which earned 0k from Kickstarter. It proves that people around the world love anime.

19.22

Now he’s explaining the basic plot of Arise: it’s Motoko in a position of suffering. Audience has more empathy for someone in that position.

19.20

A good example of how CG and 2d animation might have been combined well is The Iron Giant. Character-oriented story too.

19.19

Ishikawa: Hollywood isn’t making movies with people–you have cars, robots, etc as main characters. Proud of Japan’s legacy of 2d animation, with the detail in facial expressions.

19.17

Some of the inspiration was from the big Hollywood reboots of superhero franchises: Bryan Singer’s Batman movies, the new Spider Man, etc.

19.16

Arise takes place 2 years before the main GitS story, what Motoko was doing before Section 9.

19.15

Right now Ishikawa is still talking. We haven’t gotten to questions yet.

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The desire was to make something completely new: new staff, new music, new voice actors, new director. The internet had a backlash…

19.13

There will be 4 episodes of GitS Arise, 50 minutes each.

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Ishikawa met with Masamune Shirow (GitS creator) and they looked at shows like CSI, 24, and the fact that they were one hour eps…they wanted to do something of that length.

19.09

Yamato had been considered a “dead” project, and there was some doubts about its success. But “we proved them wrong.”

19.07

Ishikawa: Production IG’s four big projects are: #AttackOnTitan, Kuroko no Basket, the new Yamato 2199 series, and Ghost in Shell Arise.

16.41

And that’s it.

16.41

Q: What are some of the differences in the voice acting business now vs your mother’s time? A: in her mother’s day, voice acting was a single occupation–and there were fewer works, so more people watched the same things. Now there is so much anime so she has to try her best to keep up. She hopes her work will be loved for a long time.

16.38

Are any roles more difficult to play than others? Sumire was one of the most difficult characters. Hard to express her romantic emotions.

16.36

On her role in Yuyushiki. It was an “iyashikei” role with very realistic dialogue.

16.35

Will there be more Chihayafuru anime? She doesn’t know.

16.32

Apparently the guy who did Taichi in Chihayafuru was a real entertainer, “always on, never off.”

16.27

On HanaKana: impressed with the number of types of shoes (and what they represented) in her role in that movie. 🙂

16.25

Q: What was it like working on Kotonoha no Niwa with Makoto Shinkai and Kana Hanazawa? A: was already a fan of Shinkai’s work. It was a dream come true to play a role in his work. Shinkai had seen a lot of her work already, and he told her that her role was best!

16.20

Q: What was it like to play Ellie in the Japanese version of “The Last of Us”? A: she didn’t take age or race into account when playing the role.

16.18

Q: was it hard to learn all the history behind karuta cards? A: Her knowledge of karuta grew in tandem with her character’s.

16.15

Q: Would you like to be an actress in a live action film? A: Very interested in playing her role in Chihayafuru in live action…and Naruto.

16.14

Why did Han follow her mother into voice acting? She was immersed in it from an early age. Strange to hear her mom’s voice on TV and at home.

17.24

The roundtable, and the event is over. Thanks for bearing with me! #SANA

17.22

McKeever: we have come a long way since the anti-Japan days of the early 1980s, and anime has played a role in that. #SANA

17.17

Positive: the response from the community to the tsunami/earthquake was overwhelming and generous. #SANA

17.17

Negative: a lot of American fans assume everyone in Japan likes anime. Which is certainly not the case. #SANA

17.12

Sullivan: she recalls Funis trouble with Dance in the Vampire Bund as an example of some shows that will always have trouble in US #SANA

17.11

Freedman: fandom is sometimes very locational. What’s popular in Akiba is actually quite specific. #SANA

17.10

I asked the panelists if there are things that appeal to American fandom vs Japanese otaku or even blog fandom…#SANA

16.05

McKeever: cons are places where all other differences between people about race, politics, sexual orientation etc fade away #SANA

16.01

Sullivan: another factor to the gender fluidity is that Christianity was never a heavy influence in Japanese culture. #SANA

15.57

Question about gender/sexuality in anime: yaoi sometimes arises in the absence of strong female characters in a story #SANA

15.54

I will ask a question soon about different types of anime and levels of popularity: especially moe anime vs other types. #SANA

15.50

McKeever: there is still a way to go with cultural acceptance of animation. Extended to comedy like Family Guy but not much more. #SANA

15.48

Condry: cultural differences are not always an obstacle. Did you think a foreign rap song could make it here? No. #SANA #gangnamstyle

15.46

Condry:…but not really for artistic reasons. It was because it would take 6 months to re-edit! #SANA

15.45

Condry: recalls a story about how one American exec tried to get Studio Ghibli to excise the bathtub scene in Totoro. he refused…#SANA

15.39

Roundtable: the dumbing down of American comics in the 50s led to dumbed down American cartoons too. Set expectations #SANA

15.37

Condry: the president of the MIT anime club calls piracy *Proselytization Commons*. LOL #SANA

15.37

Condry: anime filled a space that was missing in American media for a long time, animation for teens and adults. #SANA

15.34

Roundtable: the rise of science fiction, and interest in space in the Cold War, helped paved the way for SF anime. #SANA

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15.30

Now the roundtable q&a starts on the central question: why is anime so popular in North America? #SANA

15.27

Yamaguchi: people who like anime will often begin to appreciate other aspects of Japanese culture too. Reinforces trust #SANA

15.27

Yamaguchi: hopes that the Japanese will have their eyes opened to who they are how they communicate to people in other nations #SANA

15.25

Yamaguchi:

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15.23

Roundtable starting, introduced by Tadahiko Yamaguchi from the Consulate. #SANA

15.18

The roundtable discussion will begin in about 5 minutes, and will be introduced by a member of the Japanese consulate. #SANA

15.11

Beck will be starting a new blog called Animation Scoop in a couple of weeks. There will be a prominent anime section/reviews. #SANA

15.02

Beck: Dreamworks only put out GitS2 and Millennium Actress so that there would be 5 Oscar nominations for animated film that year #SANA

14.57

Beck: the outlaw, the different aspect of anime is what appeals to Americans. There was something more real about it. #SANA

14.56

Beck: life mission is to show that animation is not just for kids. Put them in non-traditional places like art theaters. #SANA

14.53

Beck met Katsuhiro Otomo in 1989. #SANA

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14.52

Beck met Katsuhiro Otomo in 1989. Later released more work by him (Neo-Tokyo compilation). #SANA

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14.49

Apparently Sam Raimi wanted to be involved in the production of Akira in those days. Only known then for Evil Dead #SANA

14.48

The first execs who saw Akira in 1988 was turned off the moment they saw blood. The notion of cartoons = kids was hard to break. #SANA

14.47

The Japanese producers of Akira wanted an Oscar-winning director to direct the dub. They got one–a documentary director. #SANA

14.46

Beck: after the theatrical releases of Laputa and others, got Akira. He came up with the tagline, Neo-Tokyo is about to Explode #SANA

14.38

Beck along with Carl Macek start Streamline Pictures. First paid job: dubbing Totoro, then Kiki. It was for Japanese airlines. #SANA

14.36

Beck: the audience for anime by the 80s was through comic conventions and tape trading. Rare syndicated shows on TV. Truly underground #SANA

14.33

Beck: Warriors of the Wind (a cut up Nausicaa) was typical of Hollywood attitudes in the mid 1980s. #SANA #SMH

14.30

Beck met Osamu Tezuka in 1980 in NYC, and they ate sushi together and Tezuka gave him a tape. It was rejected by United Artists then. #SANA

14.22

Beck: in the 1970s you did not have video. He got mint condition 16mm print reels for the conventions instead. #SANA

14.21

Beck started watching anime in the 1960s. 8th Man made him go *holy shit.* Went to one of the first comic cons in the 1960s too. #SANA

14.16

Beck: Magic Boy was the first Japanese animated film distributed by an American company (MGM) in 1961. Astro Boy was 2 years later. #SANA

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14.09

Next up: Jerry Beck, of Cartoon Brew. #SANA

14.06

McKeever: the Internet has reduced the power of distributors and content owners are now the kings. #SANA

14.04

McKeever: there needs to be more mainstream and less niche shows. And the quality of anime has to improve too. #SANA

14.03

McKeever: anime producers and distributors will need to rely more on merchandising to make up for lost DVD sales. #SANA

14.01

McKeever: a big problem too is that streaming doesn’t make money vs DVDs, and DVDs are in steep decline. #SANA

14.00

McKeever: the continued devaluing of the yen vs the dollar has made licensing anime a lot more expensive in the US. #SANA

13.47

McKeever: what anime needs is venture capital, enough money to take creative risks. Look at the 80s classics made during the boom. #SANA

13.45

McKeever: when animation in general expands, so does anime. #SANA

13.42

McKeever is now sharing stories about encounters with closet Robotech fans in Washington DC government and lobbying circles. #SANA

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13.35

McKeever: you CAN make money in anime. Already gone very far in the past several decades. The market for animation for adults is big #SANA

13.30

McKeever is not concerned about the live action Robotech and Cowboy Bebop projects. He sees this as progress, in Hollywood. #SANA

13.28

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McKeever: Animation in the 80s on the networks was relegated to Saturday morning only for kids. Robotech/Macross broke that mold. #SANA

13.24

McKeever: Robotech was the third highest rated program in LA in Nov 1985, and #1 in NYC in Feb 1986. At the time anime on TV was rare. #SANA

13.19

McKeever traces the birth of the US anime industry to the late 70s-early 80s, when a strong dollar made anime cheap to pick up #SANA

13.16

First up: Kevin McKeever, the marketing exec in charge of the Robotech franchise at Harmony Gold. #SANA

12.08

Lunchtime now. This concludes the morning session, and my computer needs recharging! See you for the afternoon. #SANA

12.07

Condry: Crypton licensing model and other fandom work show that people can have power despite corps, govts, copyright models #SANA

12.05

Condry: for non-profit use, there may be a nominal fee but not necc. For-profit does involve a license fee. #SANA

12.04

Condry: Crypton Future Media has set up 3 levels of licensing for using Miku. One is free non-commercial use. #SANA

11.57

Condry: AMVs, Vocaloid fandom shows fans will not wait for permission to start creating things #SANA

11.54

Condry: manga is particularly democratic as media because it is so inexpensive. Series rise and fall w/o marketing #SANA

11.52

Condry: another great case study is Gundam. Its toys did not sell so it was canceled early, but fans revive it singlehandedly #SANA

11.50

Condry: anime characters as platforms. Characters and world often come before story. Red Gardens plot made up as went along #SANA

11.49

Condry visited Gonzo during the making of Red Garden…this is the work environment. #SANA

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11.45

Condry: success and value are not measured in fandom community the same way as in business. It is how much you give back #SANA

11.38

Condry: no one gets rich making anime. Shows a picture of a typical animator desk. #SANA

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11.36

Condry was introduced to anime when his students recommended Samurai Champloo to him. Via BitTorrent. #SANA

11.34

This is Condry showing the folders used to produced Mamoru Hosodas Wolf Children. #SANA

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11.33

Some stats: 60% of TV cartoon broadcasts are Japanese. B/yr for TV/DVD/theaters. Bu B worth of merchandise. #SANA

11.32

Media has shifted from mostly content to now a whole platform with lots of participation through communities, AMVs, fanfic, etc #SANA

11.21

Condry: few expected anime to be a big deal, culturally. The global rise of anime was a surprise to cultural elites. #SANA

11.18

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11.16

Next up: Dr. Ian Condry, professor of Japanese Cultural Studies at MIT.

11.06

Sullivan: …whereas in Japan some of that kind of work can be seen as disrespectful. (ED: But then again, doujinshi?) #SANA

11.05

Sullivan: US anime fans like to feel a part of the show they like, which fuels the memes, parodies, AMVs, fanfics… #SANA

10.57

I saw this in Japan when I was in Akiba too. The industry in JP is still built on purchase of physical stuff.

10.56

Sullivan: DVDs/BDs are not going away from anime because of collector mentality, special editions. #SANA

10.54

Sullivan: a good example of anime as safe place for sexual exploration—Utena. A beautiful, influential show. #SANA

10.50

Bevins (ADR director): Americans and Japanese have different expectations for character voices hence different voice acting styles. #SANA

10.39

Sullivan: to all those who criticize anime as being violent and bad influence—look at the cons. Look at the community. #SANA

10.38

Fandom as family: when Sullivan started working at Funi she found her tribe. Tribe is a good word in my experience. #SANA

10.36

Personally, I would argue the process started earlier with the Simpsons, Family Guy, and others…

10.35

Sullivan: the rise of MLP and Adventure Time has also paved the way for more acceptance of mature themes in anime. #SANA

10.34

Sullivan: anime can be a safer place for younger people to explore sexuality and gender. #SANA

10.32

Sullivan: shift from solitary otaku to owning your freak: fandom coalescing into clubs, communities. #SANA

10.31

Bevins: because anime has something for everyone, anime should become more mainstream over time. Ease of access too. #SANA

10.29

Sullivan acknowledges Crunchyroll as having innovated first, and their move to legitimacy was a huge shift in industry #SANA

10.28

‘I love our fans. I love our fandom.’ -Sarah Sullivan #SANA

10.22

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10.21

Now the Funimation reps, Christopher Bevins and Sarah Sullivan, are up. #SANA

10.18

A lot of people at University of Oregon take Japanese in order to scanlate and fansub. Some even use that as assignments. #SANA

10.14

Sullivan will be a presenter later, btw. #SANA

10.14

Sarah Sullivan (Funimation): the biggest difference between older and millennial fans is how willing they are to WAIT for anime. #SANA

10.08

Freedman likes to hold up a VHS tape and ask her 90s and later born students: what is this? Gets laughs. #SANA

10.01

The instant access of the Internet has changed both access to anime and participation in fandom drastically #SANA

09.58

So what makes anime so popular? Freedman: the participatory fandom, the coolness of niche, different storytelling. #SANA

09.45

This is somewhat deliberate: it emphasizes vulnerability rather than, say, harder aspects of Japanese culture. #SANA

09.44

So much of the soft power of anime and manga is in promoting the more kawaii side as opposed to other types. #SANA

09.40

Worth remembering: Japanese popular culture has been in America as long as Godzilla and Astro Boy. #SANA

09.38

How strange is it that Hello Kitty and Doraemon were chosen as “ambassadors”! Ambassadors are usually people. #SANA

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First up: Dr. Alisa Freedman, Professor of Japanese Literature and Film, University of Oregon. #SANA

09.28

Looks like we are starting! #SANA

09.16

Still waiting. Sound has been going in and out. Looks like posting pics may be an issue with the liveblog plugin, will find workarounds. #SANA

09.05

Waiting for the event to begin. A surprisingly large crowd, given the weather outside… #SANA

16.52

The story seems to be that #tokyopop is starting over almost from scratch. Makes sense given how much business changed.

16.40

Q: any plans to rerelease manhwa? A: they lost the licenses from the main licensor. #tokyopop #animela

16.39

Viz is different because they are an arm of the Japanese publisher. Avoid translation costs. #tokyopop #animela

16.38

The hard part of being an indie publisher is capital–and the ability to weather the storm. #tokyopop #animela

16.33

Q: light novels? A: translation costs are enormous, more than manga! Chances are small. #animela #tokyopop

16.32

Q: anything else like America’s Greatest Otaku? A: timing was bad on its original release. Maybe if it gets sponsored. #tokyopop #animela

16.28

It’s funny because there are so few Hetalia fans in the audience. Everyone’s getting the trivia wrong! #animela #tokyopop

16.22

It’s trivia time now about Hetalia for prizes. There will be q&a next. #tokyopop #animela

16.21

Stu admits that OEL didn’t really sell. But feels many of the stories were great. #animela #tokyopop

16.18

Film and tv projects: perhaps adapt OEL manga since those are what they have rights to. #animela #tokyopop

16.17

Other projects: on demand merchandise via Cafepress. Designs swapped out regularly. #tokyopop #animela

16.11

Fans tell #tokyopop what might be licensible; then tell Japanese what looks promising. Use Kickstarter to gauge monetary interest. #animela

16.09

Potential with Kickstarter: avoids the problem of taking a risk before knowing what sales are. #tokyopop #animela

16.08

“Everybody is going through soul searching” in the industry because fewer stores, fewer sales. -Stu #animela #tokyopop

16.06

Daneilla (@tokyopopmanga): Will cancelled series be brought back? New series? Staff is small, licenses have to be (re)negotiated. #tokyopop #animela

16.03

Q: plans for working with Amazon Kindle? A: A few titles like Bizenghast are available. Only supported on the Fire and Fire HD now. #animela #tokyopop

16.02

Hetalia manga volumes 4 and 5 are under negotiation with Gentosha. They “are not known to be fast moving.” #tokyopop #animela

16.01

Hetalia vol 3 is released now with POD. The last book of Bizenghast too. #tokyopop #animela

16.00

Manga plans: print on demand via Rightstuf. Japanese licensors reluctant though. Closest to the publisher of Hetalia, Gentosha #animela #tokyopop

15.57

So in 2012, “the beginning of rebuilding #Tokyopop.” The website is now hosted by Nerdist Industries. #animela

15.55

Stu decided to go to northern Japan to volunteer with the tsunami recovery and made the documentary “Pray for Japan.” #animela #tokyopop

15.53

While Stu was in Japan to tell the Japanese publishers that he couldn’t publish anymore–the earthquake hit. #animela #tokyopop

15.52

Fact: technically, #tokyopop never went bankrupt. It became a virtual company. #animela

15.51

The end of Borders was the final blow for #tokyopop in its old configuration. Stu was left to clean up. #animela

15.49

Borders owed million in unpaid bills to #tokyopop. #animela

15.48

Plan was: get Japanese to license digital editions to TP. Then the bomb dropped: Borders died. #animela #tokyopop

15.46

Scanslation makes manga more accessible, true. You just can’t run a business on it. #animela #tokyopop

15.45

“We were shedding a lot of tears on that day,” Stu says. Plus scanslations played a role, no doubt. #animela

15.44

Why did #tokyopop shut down US operations? They once had 90 staff in LA…to about 35 after economic crisis. #animela

15.40

Mission has not changed fundamentally: bringing Asian pop culture to western audiences. #animela #tokyopop

15.39

Reminiscing about the start of TP as Mixx, first licensor of Sailor Moon manga. ALso I had no idea that TP brought Japanese pro wrestlers to E3.

15.37

Stu Levy introduces himself, calls himself an “old guy” 🙂 #animela #tokyopop

18.53

Carlos Santos: all those feels about Kitchen Princess. The Madoka Magica of cooking manga! #sdcc

18.51

Underrated: Breathe Deeply (Doton Yamaaki). Love triangle about two guys and a sick girl. #sdcc #manga

18.50

Underrated: To All Corners of the World (Fumiyo Kouno). About childhood friends getting married at the end of WWII. #sdcc #manga

18.48

Chihayafuru (Yuki Suetsugu)…still unlicensed. Hey if the anime could make it, why not? #sdcc #manga

18.48

Boku wa Beatles (Tetsuo Fujii and Kaiji Kawaguchi), about two boys who travel back in time knowing Beatles songs before they’re out. #sdcc #manga

18.47

Sunny, by Taiyo Matsumoto. Still not licensed. #sdcc #manga

18.46

Osamu Tezuka’s Barbara. DMP has a Kickstarter campaign to publish this. Features bestiality, satanic rituals…carries explicit warning. #sdcc #manga

18.45

The Strange Tale of Panorama Island (Suehiro Maruo). Gorgeous artwork, anticipated for the last two years. #sdcc #manga

18.44

Thermae Romae comes out in November by Yen Press, btw. #sdcc #manga

18.44

Thermae Romae (Mari Yamazaki). YES the anime made me laugh so hard…#sdcc #manga

18.43

Most anticipated: Kitaro (Shigeru Mizuki), by Drawn and Quarterly in January 2013. #sdcc #manga

18.42

Most Anticipated Manga: Heart of Thomas (Moto Hagio). It was one of the seminal BL titles. #sdcc #manga

18.41

Alverson was especially irritated by the dog. That’s funny I thought he was the best part of the story. #sdcc #manga #kobato

18.40

Worst: Kobata (CLAMP): reading it is like being punched in the nose (Brigid Alverson). I did think the anime was boring…#sdcc #manga

18.39

Worst: My Girlfriend’s a Geek (Rize Shinba and Pentabu). About a guy who dates a yaoi/BL fangirl. @debaoki thinks the guy is pussywhipped! #sdcc #manga

18.38

The anime of Kore wa Zombie Desu-ka? was my dumb fun pick at the time. I guess this sort of thing doesn’t work in #manga? #sdcc

18.38

WORST list begins! Kore wa Zombie Desu-ka manga…Carlos Santo liked the anime, actually, but not the manga. #sdcc #manga

18.36

Saturn Apartments (Hisae Iwaoka). Idea is that there is a ring colony around a ruined earth. Story is about a window washer. #sdcc #manga

18.35

Dorohedoro (Q Hayashida). A violent fantasy. #sdcc #manga

18.32

20th Century Boys (Naoki Urasawa). I really need to read this. My next Viz app purchase #sdcc #manga

18.32

Best continuing manga for adults: A Bride’s Story (Kaoru Mori). Set in Central Asia in the middle ages. #sdcc #manga

18.31

Arisa (Natsumi Ando, creator of Kitchen Princess): a surprisingly dark and twisted story. #sdcc #manga

18.28

Next: Chi’s Sweet Home (Konami Kanata) which has been discussed for the past 3 years. I remember. #sdcc #manga

18.27

Next: Wandering Son (Takako Shimura). See our review here: http://animediet.net/reviews/manga-reviews/the-wandering-son #sdcc #manga

18.25

Carlos Santo: this is a manga that gives me all kinds of feels #crossgame #manga #sdcc

18.24

Next: Cross Game (Mitsuru Adachi). Still haven’t watched most of the anime though I loved episodes 1-2. #sdcc #manga

18.22

Apparently the manga and anime story diverges around volume 5. Recommended for fans of Fullmetal Alchemist. #sdcc #manga

18.22

Continuing manga for kids/teens: Blue Exorcist. Personally I was never into the anime. Is the #manga better? #sdcc

18.20

Tesoro and La Quinta Camera (Natsume Ono). Ono has struck me as being the closest #manga has to a literary writer. #sdcc

18.18

Drops of God, the wine manga. No surprise this is @debaoki’s pick, I’ve heard her rave about it a lot. Wish I could drink again… #sdcc #manga

18.16

Message to Adolf (originally just titled Adolf) by Tezuka. I read this years ago and was moved by it. #sdcc #manga

18.15

At this let me say once again: CELTY IS LOVE #durarara #sdcc #manga

18.15

Durarara!! manga (Ryohgo Narita, AKiyo Satoriigi, Suzuhito Yasuda). Wasn’t this an anime original? #sdcc #manga

18.14

Shaenon Gaerty: Anno’s artwork was shaky at first but so much better as she went along. #sdcc #manga

18.12

Best new manga for adults: Sakuran (Moyoco Anno of Hataraki Man; Hideaki Anno’s wife). A dark geisha story. #sdcc #manga

18.11

Mizuki is also the author of Ge Ge Ge Kitaro and Onwards to Our Noble Deaths, btw. #sdcc #manga

18.10

NoNonBa (Shigeru Mizuki). Mizuki only has one arm due to war injuries. And is still alive. #sdcc #manga

18.07

Next: Jiu-Jiu (Touya Tobina), though adults will probably hate it 🙂 #sdcc #manga

18.06

Next: A Devil and Her Love Song (Miyoshi Tomori). #sdcc #manga

18.05

Next on the list: Tezuka’s Princess Knight, which is considered the first proper shoujo manga. #sdcc #manga

18.04

Sailor Moon is a title that older fans have come back to for strength and reassurance. #sdcc #manga

18.03

Uh oh, the Keynote presentation moved too far ahead, we saw some spoilers…:) #sdcc #manga

18.01

Well, it’s not really new of course. But it’s a new edition/translation. #sdcc #manga #sailormoon