Tag Archives: tomino

Blood C – kill ’em all Tomino hiding among the staff?

THIS IS FUCKING ENOUGH!!! NOW TURN RED-EYED ALREADY!!!

 

Good God, man! Stop the overflowing of blood! It’s massive and tiresome. And stop the kill them all plot line! I mean, sure, for the drama, THIS IS BLOOOOOOOOOD C! Right? But sheesh, this type of nearly complete overturning of character list by killing nearly 98 % of them is just way too fucking much.

This totally reminds me of Ga Rei Zero’s first episode, where we are introduced of a bunch of characters and starting to learn about them, on pretty decent terms, and then…

KillKillKillKillKillKillKillKillKillKillKillKillKillKillKillKillKillKillKillKillKillKillKillKillKillKillKillKill…

They all fucking die! WTF???

And this time, we had over 7 episodes (before the death of one of the twins) to get to learn and like all the characters, before Tomino the show just decides to kill them all and pour buckets of blood upon us. I mean, Shit! This is so close to what B- flicks would do that it isn’t interesting, at all.

OK! We get it! It’s Blood C! But jesus, stop raining down blood on us! Or at least declare a formal WWIII on Saya and the audience first before the God of character-kill KILL THEM ALL TOMINO shows us his powers! Who the fuck summoned him, anyway?

The plot is supposed to be cranking up and becoming more and more relevant and clear, but the over-bloodiness is just too distracting even for this anime veteran. After all, there’s only so much killing that one can take in a non-B flick before he calls “mercy” or “give up”.

There was so much blood and so many established characters that died that the show became shitty. Spare us, please, but more importatntly,

Kill ’em all plots just doesn’t work in 2011. Please don’t fucking pull that shit again; it was even quite tiring when I saw it for Gundam V, which was made in 1989-1990.

Of course Tomino isn’t in this show, but this style is just so…sigh…

P.S. found the screen cap from the good reviewers here. And these people have great reasons to be angry about this shit!

Gundam Creator Tomino @ NYAF

Mobile Suit Gundam celebrated its 30th anniversary this year, and creator Yoshiyuki Tomino (富野 由悠季) was the guest of honor at New York Anime Festival.  Anime Diet recorded his keynote address.

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(Edit, 9-30, 10:13 AM: the progress bar and time are now working. Plus, the video is watermarked, for the convenience of all the video thieves out there.)

Tomino was very dignified throughout his appearance at the convention.  In keeping with his professional demeanor, he made a great effort to be polite.  Even when asked directly, he refused to say anything bad about his experiences working with Osamu Tezuka, creator of Astro Boy (鉄腕アトム). It has been widely observed that in the early days, Tezuka’s budget was tight and his deadlines were brutal, which many have speculated may have led to a hostile working environment.  During the Q&A session following his speech, Tomino suggested that anime creation in general creates friction, noting, “If working together with others was easy, I would have produced thirty more works like Gundam.”

Tomino signing a sketch of the R78 Gundam. Photography by Eric M Chu.
Tomino signing a sketch of the R78 Gundam. Photography by Eric M Chu.

In person at his autograph signing, Tomino was charming and playful, joking with fans, posing for pictures, and drawing smiley faces alongside his autographs.  However, his patience was tried by a poor translator, who was unable to keep up with him despite stopping him a few times to request clarifications.  A bit of checking revealed that the translator used for Tomino had prior experience in translation, but almost none in live translation.  The translator apparently wanted the honor of handling the keynote address, and Tomino assented, a decision that he later regretted.  At just over nine minutes into his speech, Tomino’s staff issued a statement that “a proper translation will be available later,” causing a strong reaction from the frustrated audience.

To be fair, Tomino’s discussion became very complex.  I was not able to follow it all myself.  Essentially, his rhetoric went along the lines of, “A picture may be beautiful, but that alone does not make cinema.  A story may be excellent, but it alone does not make cinema.  What is it, then, that elevates work to the level of cinema?  It is only through the synthesis of disparate elements from different creators that cinema is produced.”

It was an attempt by one of Japan’s finest creative minds to give a deep discussion of art, and I truly appreciated being in the presence of a genius willing to share a glimpse of how he viewed his work.

Tomino posing.  Photography by Eric M Chu.
Tomino posing for us. Photography by Eric M Chu.