Tag Archives: Jin-Roh

Anime Diet’s Hidden Gems – Reviews, Discussions and More

Anime Diet Presents: Best Kept Secret of Anime Diet’s archive, part 1.

Looking for previously unread articles? Then our 10+ hours of work combing through 147 pages to find these little gems is definitely worth every second! Enjoy these as our year-end gift to you!

Reviews:


    Alien Nine: Utter Alienation

    Alteil

    Akira

    Asura Cryin’ 1 Review

    Black Lagoon

    Boogiepop Phantom

    Bubblegum Crisis OAV

    Review: Byousoku 5cm–The Color of Regret

    Cencoroll Review

    Claymore Review

    Code – E

    Eureka Seven: Decompression

    GA: Geijutsuka Art Design Class

    Ghost in the Shell: Solid State Society Review

    Hatsukoi Limited Review

    Hayate no Gotoku 01

    Jin Roh

    Kaiba Review

    Kannagi Review

    Kobato Impression

    Les Miserables – Shoujo Cosette 1

    Lucky Star Review

    Mahoromatic

    Myself; yourself Review

    Noein Review

    Review: School Days–The Wages of Sin

    Sayonara Zetsubo Sensei s1 impression

    Serial Experiment Lain

    Seto no Hanayome

    Shingetsutan Tsukihime

    Toki wo Kakeru Shoujo (The Girl Who Leapt Through Time)

    Welcome to the NHK

    The Zen of Eureka Seven

    Zero no Tsukaima – Futatsuki Kishi Review

Commentaries/Discussions:


    Aversion and hikikomori

    Civil Liberties Continue to Crumble

    Cyberpunk anime – the past, the present, the future (?) Part 1.

    Cyberpunk anime – past, present, future (?) Part 2.

    Cyberpunk anime – past, present, future (?) Part 3.

    Cyberpunk anime – past, present, future (?) Part 4

    Cyberpunk anime – past, present, future (?) Part 5 – Toward the Future I call the “Individulity Project”.

    Discussion on making Japanese title into English

    Discussion on making Japanese title into English pt.2

    Fan Service – What I think…

    Face Off: Ray and Mike Heap Praise on Kurozuka

    Face Off: Ray and Mike on Gunbuster vs. Diebuster (Part 1)

    Face Off: Ray and Mike on Gunbuster vs. Diebuster (Part 2)

    Face Off: Ray and Mike Try to Figure Out Kurozuka

    Horror Anime Selection

    Hayate no Gotoku 21 – Lead Me Home

    Is Anime Deep?

    Is Anime Deep, pt.2?

    Love and Purity in Ponyo

    Mortality in anime and manga

    Persona: Trinity Soul–the awesomest title EVAR

    The cancer that is killing Bleach

Miscellaneous:

    Adventures in Blogosphere: Episode 2, Attack of the Domos

    Claymore 18,19 Parody – The Chaotic War of Cirumcision in the North

    Do You Ever Talk Back to Your Anime?

    So if 86.5% of Japanese do not like lolicons…

    Soundtracks that are Better than the Show

    Weird Soundtrack Cravings

    Yaoi doujin artist arrested.

Interviews:


    AX 2008 Press Junket Interview: Shokotan

    EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW! A Night With The Pillows.

The Vault 04: Jin-Roh

jin-roh-back.jpg

Explanation of the Vault series

Originally published on March 9, 2003. The review originally said that Mamoru Oshii directed the film, which is incorrect. It has since been corrected. This is another “short review” where the first paragraph is summary and second paragraph evaluation.

JIN-ROH: THE WOLF BRIGADE
directed by Hiroyuki Okiura; written by Mamoru Oshii (1998)

In an alternate post-WWII scenario, Japan is on the brink of social chaos. The occupation has failed to turn Japan into a stable society by the late 1950s. Anti-government protesters and terrorists regularly battle with the authorities, setting off napalm cocktails and bombs. To combat the disorder, a storm-trooperesque division of the police–the Special Forces–is formed. This force is decked out in Nazi-style helmets with glowing red infrared eyeholes, and they are as ruthless as wolves in hunting their prey. But one day, Fuse, an ordinary member of the Forces, encounters an innocent Little Red Riding Hood-like girl clutching a backpack full of explosives. He survives the blast, but she does not. In the aftermath, Fuse goes on a soul-searching journey to discover why he didn’t have it in him to shoot her first, all while poltical forces conspire to get rid of the Special Forces altogether.

Jin-Roh is a deeply intelligent, mature animated film that seems to belong in a seperate category from most Japanese anime. The dystopian 1950s Japan depicted in the film is bleak, but believable. Oshii’s reflective, meditative style serves him well this time, unlike in the pretentious Ghost in the Shell–by keeping the focus on the main character’s self-discovery and on the theme of the effects of violence on the human soul, as well as the deft parallels to the original Little Red Riding Hood tale, the film achieves a kind of resonance and significance rare in anime. Sometimes the political relationships between the two different police forces are confusing, but the dramatic core of the story–the budding relationship between the suicide bomber’s sister and Fuse–is strong, and is a vehicle for character exploration. Also, the memorable soundtrack by Hajime Mizoguchi (with a little help from Yoko Kanno) shines, accentuating some deeply powerful and unsettling scenes. The film may not be for everyone, as its pacing is deliberate and its politics are tangled. But for those with the patience to look under its surface, there is a rewarding amount of depth to discover. The Special Edition DVD, with a soundtrack CD and an extra disc included, is highly recommended for purchase.


Michael is on hiatus for the remainder of August. The Vault series resurrects entries from his personal blog about anime, written from 2002-2006. Entries will appear in the series every other day.